Historical Pictures of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad



Album 2

Northern California railroad pictures are from past calendars by the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Historical Society. Become a member!

 

It's early in 1941 and early in the morning at Sonoma, Station No. 43a (miles from San Francisco). Engine 141, built by Alco, 1914, will soon make up her train and depart southward to the Bay Area. Later in the year this would become the end of the Sonoma Valley Branch with the rails northward to Los Cuilicos removed.

It's early in 1941 and early in the morning at Sonoma, Station No. 43a (miles from San Francisco). Engine 141, built by Alco, 1914, will soon make up her train and depart southward to the Bay Area. Later in the year this would become the end of the Sonoma Valley Branch with the rails northward to Los Cuilicos removed.

 

Two graceful engines for the price of one. It's April 10, 1938, and engine 23 with R&LHS excursion from San Francisco, arrives at Willits shortly after noon. She drops helper SP 2514, takes her long train around the wye, and pulls up beside California Western 22. CWR 22 and 23 will doublehead the train to Fort Bragg.

Two graceful engines for the price of one. It's April 10, 1938, and engine 23 with R&LHS excursion from San Francisco, arrives at Willits shortly after noon. She drops helper SP 2514, takes her long train around the wye, and pulls up beside California Western 22. CWR 22 and 23 will doublehead the train to Fort Bragg.

 

Deep in the "Redwood Empire," NWP No.16 pauses to pose with her crew at McCann in 1910. This was the southern end of the NWP at one point before the railroad was completed in 1914. Built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1886; became Pacific Lumber Company No. 3 in 1897. Came to NWP predecessors in 1902.

Deep in the "Redwood Empire," NWP No.16 pauses to pose with her crew at McCann in 1910. This was the southern end of the NWP at one point before the railroad was completed in 1914. Built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1886; became Pacific Lumber Company No. 3 in 1897. Came to NWP predecessors in 1902.

 

Train No. 1 stops at Cloverdale, headed by beloved #23, the last NWP 4-4-0 in service. It was great afternoon light on December 7, 1941, an historic date, but deceptively quiet. The closed station, marked for preservation, went up in smoke one dark night in 1991, done in by an arsonist.

Train No. 1 stops at Cloverdale, headed by beloved #23, the last NWP 4-4-0 in service. It was great afternoon light on December 7, 1941, an historic date, but deceptively quiet. The closed station, marked for preservation, went up in smoke one dark night in 1991, done in by an arsonist.

 

Spirited doubleheader welcomes the Fourth of July in 1904. No. 6 and another 4-4-0 blast past the station at Preston, just north of Cloverdale. It was California Northwestern Railway at that time (the successor to SF&NP after 1898). Looks like an excursion headed for Santa Rosa.

Spirited doubleheader welcomes the Fourth of July in 1904. No. 6 and another 4-4-0 blast past the station at Preston, just north of Cloverdale. It was California Northwestern Railway at that time (the successor to SF&NP after 1898). Looks like an excursion headed for Santa Rosa.

 

On the wharf at San Quentin Landing.. North Shore (NPC) No. 2, "Jackrabbit," 0-4-4T. Three-foot gauge, Mason 1874. San Rafael & San Quentin was a 3 1/2-mile line taken over by North Pacific Coast in 1875; it had been an unknown wider gauge. Ferries came from San Francisco to this point.

On the wharf at San Quentin Landing.. North Shore (NPC) No. 2, "Jackrabbit," 0-4-4T. Three-foot gauge, Mason 1874. San Rafael & San Quentin was a 3 1/2-mile line taken over by North Pacific Coast in 1875; it had been an unknown wider gauge. Ferries came from San Francisco to this point.

 

San Francisco & North Pacific 20, posing with crew and caboose at Ukiah, early 1900's. Built by American Locomotive Company in 1902, the attractive engine became NWP 103. Another great shot by Carpenter on a glass plate that has been damaged by poor storage and was fortunately saved in the nick of time.

San Francisco & North Pacific 20, posing with crew and caboose at Ukiah, early 1900's. Built by American Locomotive Company in 1902, the attractive engine became NWP 103. Another great shot by Carpenter on a glass plate that has been damaged by poor storage and was fortunately saved in the nick of time.

 

Narrow-gauge North Pacific Coast No. 6 "Valley Ford" 4-4-0. Baldwin 1874. Posed at Mill Valley (Eastland) circa 1901 with station agent Rivers. This engine was leased to Dollar Lumber Company in 1903 and later recalled as No. 22.

Narrow-gauge North Pacific Coast No. 6 "Valley Ford" 4-4-0. Baldwin 1874. Posed at Mill Valley (Eastland) circa 1901 with station agent Rivers. This engine was leased to Dollar Lumber Company in 1903 and later recalled as No. 22.

 

Northwestern Pacific electric train, on the superb system serving southern Marin County, stops at Ross Station on its southbound run to the ferry terminal at Sausalito. This is 1938 and the system had less than three years more to operate. The steel electric cars got their power from a "third rail" beside the tracks (under the board covers on both sides of the fence).

Northwestern Pacific electric train, on the superb system serving southern Marin County, stops at Ross Station on its southbound run to the ferry terminal at Sausalito. This is 1938 and the system had less than three years more to operate. The steel electric cars got their power from a "third rail" beside the tracks (under the board covers on both sides of the fence).

 

Could it be that North Pacific Coast No.1 "Saucelito" (old spelling) was built by Baldwin in 1873 as a 2-6-0 and then converted to 4-4-0 by NPC before sale to L E White Lumber Company in 1876? Here the engine is shown, now named "Ajax," at Elk, where she served for about 25 years or more hauling logs out of the canyons and down to a mill on the coast.

Could it be that North Pacific Coast No.1 "Saucelito" (old spelling) was built by Baldwin in 1873 as a 2-6-0 and then converted to 4-4-0 by NPC before sale to L E White Lumber Company in 1876? Here the engine is shown, now named "Ajax," at Elk, where she served for about 25 years or more hauling logs out of the canyons and down to a mill on the coast.

 


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The Alton & Pacific Railroad was a privately owned tourist attraction located on Highway 36 in nearby Alton. It no longer exists.

 

Heralded the "City of Fortuna", this steam locomotive, originally the Hammond Lumber Company Number 16, was once located near the entrance in Rohner Park. It is now being operated as an excursion train in Washington.
More information about this ALCO 2-8-2T.

 

For many years the Pacific Lumber Company used the railroad to move their lumber from the mills to shipping areas. They operated passenger trains as well. Here are some recent pictures of their railroad operations.

 

Three trainmen were killed in January 1953 at the Scotia Bluff when a landslide took their locomotive, the NWP184, into the icy Eel River. (Bill Bish pictures)